Case Studies / Fremantle Dockers

Overview
The port town of Fremantle in Western Australia has been passionate about playing Aussie Rules football since 1895, when the first WAFA premiership was contested by four local clubs. Yet it wasn’t until 1995 that Fremantle launched the Fremantle Dockers Football Club, as one of the League’s youngest teams.

Problem
The Fremantle Dockers found itself in a unique situation. Its heritage dated back over a century, yet in the AFL it was considered a baby. Over 16 seasons, they have built up a fiercely loyal and passionate fan base. But the success of every AFL team depends on the size and growth of its support base. The Fremantle Dockers realised it was time to broaden the brand’s appeal and lure a fresh generation of supporters, corporate sponsors and members to secure the Club’s future.

Solution
As part of an initial brand audit, investigatory research was conducted with supporters and members to review their brand elements.  After being appointed by the Fremantle Dockers in 2009, Block was provided the results of the brand audit and tasked with cleaning up the visual brand elements.

The new logo and uniform design aimed to replace the clunky, disparate elements – creating a style guide that is simple, classic and timeless.  The new monogram is traditional and enduring, repositioning the Fremantle Dockers as a down-­to-­business club to be reckoned with.

Block continues to work on the creative assets for the Fremantle Dockers including the 2011 and 2012 marketing campaigns.

Outcomes
The rebranding is a major element of the Club’s future direction, and its unveiling in October 2010 was regarded as an important phase in the Club’s history. In a sense, it signifies the rebirth the Club.

2011 merchandise sales doubled budget expectations and saw the Dockers move from the bottom of the league for merchandise sales into the top tier of merchandise revenue earners. The success of Fremantle Dockers’s rebranding is the culmination of three years of holistic organisational and cultural change.